This morning, Mental Floss posted a short piece about a study from the San Antonio Health Science Center that measured height, weight, waist circumference, and diet soda intake in 474 participants over a period of ten years.

The study found that — diet soda addicts, brace yourselves — “Diet soda drinkers saw a 70 percent increase in waist circumference (compared to non-diet soda drinkers). Users who consumed two or more diet sodas a day saw their waistlines increase 500 percent more than the non-diet soft drinking group. Excessive abdominal fat correlates with a higher risk of diabetes and also increases the chances of diseases such as colorectal cancer or high blood pressure.”

A separate study also found a link between longtime aspartame consumption and increased resistance to insulin.

What this means, according to researchers, is that “policies that would promote the consumption of diet soft drinks may have unintended deleterious effects,” or, to rephrase, diet soda is going to make you gain weight and then kill you.

We here at Trove would like to propose a moment of silence to commemorate the passing of a long-time, beloved friend. 

Just kidding — it will take more than the threat of undesired weight gain and eventual death to deter us from the sweet nectar of Diet Cherry Coke. 


» Stay up to date with this life-changing issue by following Trove’s Diet Soda, Health, and Obesity channels.

This morning, Mental Floss posted a short piece about a study from the San Antonio Health Science Center that measured height, weight, waist circumference, and diet soda intake in 474 participants over a period of ten years.

The study found that — diet soda addicts, brace yourselves — “Diet soda drinkers saw a 70 percent increase in waist circumference (compared to non-diet soda drinkers). Users who consumed two or more diet sodas a day saw their waistlines increase 500 percent more than the non-diet soft drinking group. Excessive abdominal fat correlates with a higher risk of diabetes and also increases the chances of diseases such as colorectal cancer or high blood pressure.”

A separate study also found a link between longtime aspartame consumption and increased resistance to insulin.

What this means, according to researchers, is that “policies that would promote the consumption of diet soft drinks may have unintended deleterious effects,” or, to rephrase, diet soda is going to make you gain weight and then kill you.

We here at Trove would like to propose a moment of silence to commemorate the passing of a long-time, beloved friend.

Just kidding — it will take more than the threat of undesired weight gain and eventual death to deter us from the sweet nectar of Diet Cherry Coke.

» Stay up to date with this life-changing issue by following Trove’s Diet Soda, Health, and Obesity channels.

Troving Reporter: Games and Frontiers

Game systems, cell phones and sports topped the list of most-read channels over the past 24 hours. Want to see what everyone else sees? Here’s the list for your adding pleasure:

» PlayStation
» Science
» Personal Finance
» National Security
» Oscar Contenders
» Washington Redskins
» Horse Racing
» Google
» Pakistan
» Egypt

Have you signed up for Trove yet? Sign in with your Facebook credentials and we’ll start you off by trying to match our more than 3,000 channels to your list of Likes. After that, you can add channels of your own with a couple easy clicks.

Photo by Kiyoshi Ota/Getty Images

nationalpost:

Drug could help ease memories: studyNew research from the University of Montreal suggests a drug that reduces a stress hormone linked to recall could potentially “overwrite bad memories.” The study, reminiscent of the 2004 Jim Carrey film Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, could offer hope for people suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder, researchers say.The school announced on Thursday results of the study involving the drug, metyrapone. The substance reduces levels of cortisol, a stress hormone associated with memory recall, the researchers said. It’s theorized that by reducing a person’s level of cortisol just before retrieving a memory, doctors can make the memory less painful for the person in the future.Photo: A scene from Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. (Focus Features/Reuters)

» Find more stories on the latest research on Trove’s Science channel.

nationalpost:

Drug could help ease memories: study
New research from the University of Montreal suggests a drug that reduces a stress hormone linked to recall could potentially “overwrite bad memories.” The study, reminiscent of the 2004 Jim Carrey film Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, could offer hope for people suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder, researchers say.

The school announced on Thursday results of the study involving the drug, metyrapone. The substance reduces levels of cortisol, a stress hormone associated with memory recall, the researchers said. It’s theorized that by reducing a person’s level of cortisol just before retrieving a memory, doctors can make the memory less painful for the person in the future.

Photo: A scene from Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. (Focus Features/Reuters)

» Find more stories on the latest research on Trove’s Science channel.

Troving Reporter: Geek Out

We love geeks — let’s just put that out there. We’re a bunch of word nerds who sit in a room full of Web developers. So it’s with genuine affection that we make this observation: you folks sure do like geeky things.

The most-viewed channel over the past 24 hours was our Space Exploration channel — no surprise since the shuttle Endeavour is on a much-publicized mission.

But that’s not the only popular channel whose topic could’ve elicited playground taunts, from the politically wonky to the science-nerdish. Nudge your glasses up your nose and straighten your pocket protector for the rest of this list.

» Debt Ceiling Debate
» Energy Policy
» Typography
» Tech Roundup
» Archaeology
» Microblogging
» Organic Gardening
» Science

Photo by NASA via Getty Images

Members of an Amazonian tribe whose language doesn’t even include words for many geometric shapes had an understanding of lines, points, and angles comparable to U.S. and French schoolchildren, a new study shows.

» Read more about Mathematics and Science on Trove.

Troving Reporter: Not So Weird Science

If you were to add only one Trove channel, it should be the one that more people have added in the last 24 hours than any other: our Science channel. It’s a gold mine of facts about the world around us that’s sure to catch your interest — and, if you’re so inclined, fuel precious minutes of dinner-party conversation.

Among the stories it boasts right now: More Signs of Hidden Ocean on Saturn’s Moon; Hurricane Season Clues: More Storms Head for Land; Mobile Phones Charged With Energy From Your Voice.

If your curiosity isn’t piqued in the first screen of results, then you need to get some more curiosity.

Here’s the rest of the top 10 channel adds from the past 24 hours.
» 2012 Presidential Election
» Barack Obama
» Indie Music
» Trove.com
» Major League Baseball
» Social Media
» NHL Hockey
» Pakistan
» Boxing

Troving Reporter: It’s Getting Personal

The news of Osama bin Laden’s death might be the top story on most sites, but Trove users have been more intrigued with news about something closer to home — so close, it’s actually in their pockets.

The most viewed channel over the past 24 hours? The iPhone channel. Possibly because of that new white iPhone that was recently unveiled, or possibly because we’re all still wondering how much personal information our phones are whispering back to their makers.

Personal data is also central to the second most popular channel of the day: PlayStation. Members of the network that powers the Sony device are still reeling from a massive data breach that exposed some users’ credit card information.

Other most-viewed channels:
» Archaeology
» Pakistan
» Science
» Social Media

Photo by Getty Images

Trove Is Live!

After months of development and weeks of eager anticipation, we’re excited to invite you to try out Trove, a site that allows you to bend the news to your will.

Log in through Facebook Connect at Trove.com, then check out our streams of customized news organized in channels. You can choose from the thousands our editors have already created (like Libya, Barack Obama, Science, and, mmmm, Beer) — or you can make your own using the search bar at the top of any Trove page.

Get the full Trove welcome by watching our introduction video from Next Media Animation and reading a welcome letter from our big boss, Washington Post Co. Chairman and CEO Don Graham.

And please tell us what you think of Trove! We’re curious to hear your input.

Greg Barber
Editor

Science is a gas: Researchers in the U.K. have developed a way to measure how much methane cows emit. And they say switching up feed for cows and sheep could reduce the release of methane by 33 percent.

(Source: BBC)