Watch This Space: A Note From Trove

Dear Readers —

2011 has been a remarkable year for Trove and for the Trove Editors’ Blog. But with great invention often comes great reinvention, and in order to make this blog the best it can be, we’re doing a little tweaking.

In the next few weeks, the Trove Editors’ Blog will become the WaPo Labs Blog, focusing on news, digital innovation, and the products and musings of WaPo Labs — the Washington Post Company digital development team behind Trove and Washington Post Social Reader.

Our goal is to offer an inside look at WaPo Labs projects and give you a chance to communicate directly with members of our team, from editorial to engineering to design and more.

Keep an eye on this space to learn when the official kickoff happens. Until then, feel free to contact us with any questions, comments, or concerns. You can also connect with us on social media by using the links below.

» Trove on Twitter
» Trove on Facebook
» Trove on Google+

» Washington Post Social Reader app
» Washington Post Social Reader on Facebook
» Washington Post Social Reader on Twitter
» Washington Post Social Reader on Google+

Until then —
Your Trove Editors

amzam:

Can I be your friend? Trying the Facebook friend finder method in real life by englishnationalopera. Via @RajuNarisetti


When you think about it, social media really is weird.

» Get friendly with Trove’s Social Media, Facebook, and Twitter channels.

Troving Reporter: Sports & Songs

Forget sexting scandals and international intrigue — the minds of most Trove users seem to be focusing on less fraught pursuits: sports, music and technology. We should be hanging out with you!

The top 10 most-viewed channels of the past 24 hours:

» Tiger Woods
» Coachella Music Festival
» Twitter
» Wine
» Coldplay
» Tech Roundup
» Pizza Recipes
» U.S. Economy
» iPhone
» Science

Photo by Hans Deryk/Reuters

"As far as I can tell — we’ve all got a depressingly big sample size — a politician’s sexual fidelity in marriage, or his sexual behavior generally, doesn’t reliably tell us anything about the integrity he demonstrates when acting in his official capacity."

Conor Friedersdorf, writing in The Atlantic his thoughts on this question: Should we care about Anthony Weiner’s photo scandal?

His answer: no, we shouldn’t.

» Get more on this story by following Trove’s Anthony Weiner channel.

"Of the 237 reasons why women have sex, not one was looking at a man’s genitals."

Cindy Meston, director of the Sexual Psychophysiology Laboratory at the University of Texas at Austin, responding to a question by The Washington Post’s Monica Hesse for a column about whether women like gawking at man-parts. Hesse’s conclusion: for women, dirty pics of dudes aren’t so sexy.

The question was prompted by the dustup over a randy photo that was published on Rep. Anthony Weiner’s Twitter feed over the weekend. (Weiner says his account was hacked.)

» Get more on Trove’s Anthony Weiner and Sex and Sexuality channels.

futurejournalismproject:

Frank Pasquale ponders how the internet is increasingly converging through Facebook, Google and Apple, and wonders what values drive their decision making.
Photo: Monopoly — Social Media Edition via Emilie Ogez, Flickr/Creative Commons.

Is it wrong to really want to play this game? I’d even invite some friends over.



» Get more on all things social with Trove’s Social Media channel.

futurejournalismproject:

Frank Pasquale ponders how the internet is increasingly converging through Facebook, Google and Apple, and wonders what values drive their decision making.

Photo: Monopoly — Social Media Edition via Emilie Ogez, Flickr/Creative Commons.


Is it wrong to really want to play this game? I’d even invite some friends over.

» Get more on all things social with Trove’s Social Media channel.

(Source: futurejournalismproject)

"This week’s experiment “is about changing the perception, and it’s about being a little more strategic about what we put out there — finding the most engaging content.”"

Poynter’s Jeff Sonderman, quoting New York Times social media editor Liz Heron’s thoughts on the paper’s decision to test full-time human curation of its Twitter feed this week.

Trove’s tweets have been twitted by humans since we launched, and our friends at @washingtonpost run one of the most engaging feeds in all of Twitterdom. Just sayin’.

» Feel the tweet on Trove’s Twitter channel.

A Welcome Message From Don Graham

Welcome to Trove, a new digital news experience that gives you easy access to the information you care about. I’m excited about it, and I wanted to take a moment to tell you why.

Trove harnesses smart, flexible technology that learns from the choices you make. Some have called it “Pandora for news,” and the serendipity in its suggestions, pulled from around 10,000 sources, makes Trove a powerful tool for information discovery.

But it’s not just algorithms that drive Trove. Our editors are constantly working to inject the latest news onto the site’s home page and into channels of information that users can choose to follow. Meanwhile, our crew of engineers keeps Trove in a state of perpetual evolution.

As a Trove user, you’ll have the power to create your own channels, which you can use to follow the people, places, things, and information sources that catch your eye. Starting up your Trove experience is easy; the site uses Facebook Connect to deliver to many users a slate of channels based on their already defined interests. (If you’d like, you can read our Facebook privacy pledge.)

And Trove is, by its nature, a social experience: you can share your channels with your friends, engage with fellow site users using the conversation boards featured on every channel, and interact with Trove on Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr. And soon, you’ll be able to take Trove with you on your smartphone or tablet device. (Find out which Trove apps are available now.)

Trove will evolve rapidly; we aim to add features that will make it a dramatically different and even better experience as the year goes on. Along the way, we hope to experiment with advertising concepts. We’re pleased to begin that work with Ford, our launch sponsor, which is helping to recommend interesting channels for our users to follow.

Please give Trove a try. I’d love to hear what you think of it; feel free to send a note to our team.

Donald E. Graham
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
The Washington Post Company