Watch This Space: A Note From Trove

Dear Readers —

2011 has been a remarkable year for Trove and for the Trove Editors’ Blog. But with great invention often comes great reinvention, and in order to make this blog the best it can be, we’re doing a little tweaking.

In the next few weeks, the Trove Editors’ Blog will become the WaPo Labs Blog, focusing on news, digital innovation, and the products and musings of WaPo Labs — the Washington Post Company digital development team behind Trove and Washington Post Social Reader.

Our goal is to offer an inside look at WaPo Labs projects and give you a chance to communicate directly with members of our team, from editorial to engineering to design and more.

Keep an eye on this space to learn when the official kickoff happens. Until then, feel free to contact us with any questions, comments, or concerns. You can also connect with us on social media by using the links below.

» Trove on Twitter
» Trove on Facebook
» Trove on Google+

» Washington Post Social Reader app
» Washington Post Social Reader on Facebook
» Washington Post Social Reader on Twitter
» Washington Post Social Reader on Google+

Until then —
Your Trove Editors

Washington Post Social Reader: Start Spreading the News

It’s not every day that a product you create is announced by Mark Zuckerberg in front of a massive, tech-savvy audience, but that’s the kind of day that our team had yesterday.

The product is Washington Post Social Reader, a new app on Facebook that arranges the news based on the articles you and your friends are reading. With some help from us on the editorial team. We’ll freshen your news for you.

The stories come from The Post (of course) and content partners like The Associated Press, Reuters, Mashable, SB Nation, Slate, and more. So it’s quality stuff.

The reviews have been pretty good so far. We’re excited about it. If you haven’t tried the app yet, please give it a whirl.

amzam:

Can I be your friend? Trying the Facebook friend finder method in real life by englishnationalopera. Via @RajuNarisetti


When you think about it, social media really is weird.

» Get friendly with Trove’s Social Media, Facebook, and Twitter channels.

News Haikus: Fraudulent Faces

Facebook tattoo hoax
Better than telling Mom why
She’s in your armpit

futurejournalismproject:

Frank Pasquale ponders how the internet is increasingly converging through Facebook, Google and Apple, and wonders what values drive their decision making.
Photo: Monopoly — Social Media Edition via Emilie Ogez, Flickr/Creative Commons.

Is it wrong to really want to play this game? I’d even invite some friends over.



» Get more on all things social with Trove’s Social Media channel.

futurejournalismproject:

Frank Pasquale ponders how the internet is increasingly converging through Facebook, Google and Apple, and wonders what values drive their decision making.

Photo: Monopoly — Social Media Edition via Emilie Ogez, Flickr/Creative Commons.


Is it wrong to really want to play this game? I’d even invite some friends over.

» Get more on all things social with Trove’s Social Media channel.

(Source: futurejournalismproject)

Troving Reporter: Facebook Vs. Google

Reports have bounced around the ‘Net all day that Facebook paid for a PR campaign to smear Google — a charge Facebook denies.

No matter how that fight shakes out, these articles join a crowded field of stories pitting the tech giants against each other in terms of traffic, “likes,” and social media dominance.

But who’s winning the fight for Trove users: the Facebook channel or the Google channel? It depends on the time frame you’re considering.

Over the past 24 hours, more Trove users have viewed and added the Google channel than the Facebook channel.

The fight gets more evenly matched at the week level: Facebook beats Google on channel adds, but Google edges Facebook out in channel views.

And the winner over the life of Trove so far? Facebook, in both channel views and adds.

Full disclosure: Users must log in with Facebook Connect to access Trove. And many of the articles linked in this blog post were discovered through Google. See? We’re conflicted, too.

Channeling Your Channels: Of Rhymes and Ringtones

One of the great joys of launching Trove last week was watching the early growth of user channels: Channels on the site that are controlled not by our editorial team, but by you. They tend to be the more creative of the batch.

User channels start in two main ways: In one case, users type a topic into our search bar and decide to develop a channel around it. In the other, a user takes an existing editor-created channel and tweaks it to better match their interests. (Go ahead; we don’t mind.)

On Friday, we put out a call on our Facebook page for folks to share their favorite user channels — if you put all that work into creating a channel, why keep it to yourself, right?

Team Trove responded in force. Here, for your adding pleasure, are some of the channels they created using the same tools you have:

» From Sean McBride comes the AT&T / T-Mobile Merger channel — a merger you’d almost forget was happening based on the commercials T-Mobile’s running these days.

» Spiro Roiniotis asks: “Is there a wocket in your pocket? If so, you may want to check out the Dr. Seuss channel.”

» It’s a twofer from Moshe Cohen: A channel for soccer’s El Clásico and another for Poker Commentary. Not sure if he’s got one for betting on soccer games, but it might be worth asking.

» And says Josh Cincinnati: “I’m obligated to recommend the Beer channel. As of today, the most loquacious of all Trove channels.”

Want a channel you created featured here (and on the Trove home page)? Post it on our Facebook wall and we’ll consider it for a future blog post (hopefully soon).

A Welcome Message From Don Graham

Welcome to Trove, a new digital news experience that gives you easy access to the information you care about. I’m excited about it, and I wanted to take a moment to tell you why.

Trove harnesses smart, flexible technology that learns from the choices you make. Some have called it “Pandora for news,” and the serendipity in its suggestions, pulled from around 10,000 sources, makes Trove a powerful tool for information discovery.

But it’s not just algorithms that drive Trove. Our editors are constantly working to inject the latest news onto the site’s home page and into channels of information that users can choose to follow. Meanwhile, our crew of engineers keeps Trove in a state of perpetual evolution.

As a Trove user, you’ll have the power to create your own channels, which you can use to follow the people, places, things, and information sources that catch your eye. Starting up your Trove experience is easy; the site uses Facebook Connect to deliver to many users a slate of channels based on their already defined interests. (If you’d like, you can read our Facebook privacy pledge.)

And Trove is, by its nature, a social experience: you can share your channels with your friends, engage with fellow site users using the conversation boards featured on every channel, and interact with Trove on Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr. And soon, you’ll be able to take Trove with you on your smartphone or tablet device. (Find out which Trove apps are available now.)

Trove will evolve rapidly; we aim to add features that will make it a dramatically different and even better experience as the year goes on. Along the way, we hope to experiment with advertising concepts. We’re pleased to begin that work with Ford, our launch sponsor, which is helping to recommend interesting channels for our users to follow.

Please give Trove a try. I’d love to hear what you think of it; feel free to send a note to our team.

Donald E. Graham
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
The Washington Post Company